Thursday, April 08, 2010

Movement for Open Primaries and Nonpartisan Elections Builds Nationally

OPEN PRIMARIES
PROP 14
GOVERNORS RACES
  • Can independents seize the day? (By John Avlon, Special to CNN) Three credible independent candidates are running for governor this year in three New England states where registered independents outnumber Democrats and Republicans.
  • Independent Party launches, Cahill on board (By Kyle Cheney, Burlington Union State House News Service) Hoping to harness the energy of disenfranchised Democrats and Republicans and the state’s 2.1 million unenrolled voters – more than half of the Massachusetts electorate – a group of political advocates who reject the two major party platforms hope to soon be able to brandish the label of the Independent Party and use it to carry them to political power.
COLORADO
KANSAS
NYC CHARTER REVISION
NEW YORK 2010
TEA PARTY
  • Party Time -Tea Partiers fit into a recent pattern of conservative populist movements. (By Howard Fineman, Newsweek Web Exclusive)

3 comments:

Ross Levin said...

Nancy, please note the difference between open primaries and top two primaries. Open primaries are where independent voters can vote in party primaries, or where any voter can vote in any primary. Top two primaries - like what's being proposed in CA and LA - eliminate all but two candidates for the general election ballot. It's misleading to label top two primaries "open primaries."

Nancy Hanks said...

Ross, from the point of view of independents and decline-to-state voters, this is an open primary. As an independent, I support all kinds of open primaries because I think people who don't choose to align themselves with parties should have the right to vote in the first round of voting.

Ross Levin said...

It's not an issue of point of view. It's an issue of being truthful, to put it bluntly. Top two is not the same as open primaries.