Wednesday, May 19, 2010

Poli-Tea: A Crisis of Democracy?


Voter Turnout in the Pennsylvania and Kentucky Primary Elections

Is the non-vote a vote of no confidence in the two-party state and duopoly system of government? We are told that yesterday's two most closely watched US Senate primary elections represent a significant defeat for theDemocratic-Republican political establishment: Democrat Joe Sestak defeated career politician Arlen Specter in Pennsylvania (54% to 46%), while Republican Rand Paul routed Trey Grayson in Kentucky (59% to 35%). (ViaMemeorandum.) Yet, these results are not nearly as impressive as they may seem when one considers them in the context of overall voter turnout numbers, which hovered around 30% in both states... Read more

2 comments:

Harry Kresky said...

This is an important piece. Even though Politea is 3d party oriented, their stats support the argument that in open primaries like top two more voters will participate even if percent of paticipation among categories of voters remains constant. That is, open primaries are more democratic.

Jack Jodell said...

I also think open primaries are the only way to go. The low-voter turnout and the very existence of the Tea Party movement are proof positive of public dissatisfaction with the two major parties. The Republicans have repeatedly demonstrated they have no solutions for the nation's problems beyond tax-cutting and mere opposition to any presidential initiative, and the Democrats have proven so politically weak and wishy-washy they can't get much done. Both parties are corrupt and corporatist, and are heavily influenced by and bought out by concentrated capital. Now, more than ever, this country needs a huge influx of progressive candidates, so as to provide a true alternative to the very inept status quo!