Tuesday, June 10, 2008

TODAY'S NEWS HEADLINES for INDEPENDENT VOTERS

CAMPAIGN
  • “18 Million Cracks” (The Rutherford Lawson Blog) It can also be said that Braun, Shirley Chisolm, Lenora Fulani and Elizabeth Dole, each in their own way paved the road for Hillary.
  • November Election in the Hands of the Independents (KCBS) California's senior Senator, Dianne Feinstein told ABC's "This Week," that the race won't come down to color. It will be in the hands of independent voters.
  • Lieberman’s transformation from Dems’ VP pick to McCain mouthpiece (Muckety News) None of the talk of retribution and betrayal fazes Lieberman. He said “the post-2006 chapter of my life” has freed him from “tribal partisanship.”
  • Sunday Snapshot -- Don't Cry For Me, America (Hotline blog/National Journal) Talk show round-up-NBC's Gregory: "I think independent voters are going to be so interesting to watch in this cycle because you've got two candidates who have demonstrated success among independent voters, notably John McCain.
  • Rasmussen: Obama Leads McCain By 6 (By Justin Gardner, Donkelephant)

REFORM
Mississippians want options at the polls (By The Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal) Mississippians clearly want the option to vote in any primary they wish. If anything, they want an even more open system like Louisiana's, where all the candidates are on the same ballot, regardless of party.

LOCAL CAMPAIGNS
  • GEORGIA: Faye Coffield, Georgia Independent Candidate for Congress (Ballot Access News)
  • PENNSYLVANIA: PRESS RELEASE: Dissatisfied Clinton Supporters Flock to Third Party in Droves (Gather.com)
  • WASHINGTON: New ballot option on nonpartisan offices (Seattle Post Intelligencer)

1 comment:

Steve Rankin said...

Five times between 1966 and 1979, the Mississippi legislature passed a "top two" election system like Louisiana began using in 1975 for its state and local elections.

The Mississippi measures were twice vetoed by governors, twice rejected by the Dept. of Justice under the Voting Rights Act, and once blocked by a 3-judge federal panel.

Free Citizen